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How many eyes does a typical person have?

DIY: AKAI S20 FUSE REPLACEMENT



If you read the "Dope Machines You Didn't Know Existed" article on the AKAI S20, you would have seen that I spotted a broken one on eBay for real cheap (40$). Why I bought a broken one? In short, you can buy stuff that wont turn on, for next to nothing. If you know electronics, you can make it work for a few dollars (maybe, I want to say most likely). 

So when the S20 arrived first thing I did was open it up, and whenever something does not work, first thing you do is check the fuse.

You can skip directly to the replacement guide if you don't want the background scoop on all of this by clicking the "Replacement Guide" in the index above.


FUSE TYPE: 2.3a (SMD)

SUITABLE REPLACEMENT: 2.5a (SMD)

FUSE LOCATION: F1 (Directly next to power switch)



How do you check a fuse? Could be a different article, but why? Tell you to google it? No. It has to do with this.

1. Visually

2. Using testing equipment


 

VISUALLY:


s20 fuse

You can clearly see that something is wrong with the fuse. With the flash light held over it, and taking a photo (better then flash) it makes it a bit tough to see, but the left side it looks like it melted a bit.

Not the yellow stuff. The yellow stuff is burned flux. Flux is used to help solder flow freely. When flux is heated up during removal (or high heating) of a component it turns that color. This is an automatic giveaway that the fuse really was blown.



WITH TEST EQUIPMENT:

To test using testing equipment, such as a digital multi-meter. There are two methods to using a digital multi-meter. The first method is to use the continuity setting if your model has it. If your completely new to all of this, continuity is just point A to point B. If they are connected, they have continuity. The symbol for this, you will have to look up your model to find.

The second method is to set your multi-meter to OHMS, and have it at the lowest possible number. So if you can set it to x1 Ohms, this is the lowest resistance rating.

Now take your probes, and touch the negative probe to one side of the fuse, and the positive probe to the other side of the fuse. You can do this while the fuse is still inside the machine, or you can remove the fuse to test it. 

If your multi-meter reads 0, or nothing. The fuse is dead and needs to be replaced. If your meter shows a reading (or number), your fuse is in working order. 



HOW YOU BLOW THE FUSE:

With knowing that, quickly lets get into how you can blow your fuse. 

Reversed Polarity. Too high of voltage. This unit is designed to take 10v 850ma power supply. 

If you hit it with 12v, your most likely going to blow that fuse. 

This unit is center pin positive. If you use a power supply that is center negative, you will blow the fuse. 

Look on the power supply to see if it is center positive or center negative. Use this diagram:

polarity


So now you can safely blow your fuse, have your unit not turn on, because your saved by what you just learned.

CLICK NEXT FOR THE REPLACEMENT GUIDE

Comments   

adder
0 #14 adder 2016-05-14 22:09
Quoting Mashiro:


Yes there is a voltage regulator, however even with the heat sink allowing to dissipate heat faster, the increased heat will shorten the lifespan of the regulator faster.

How much faster, whos know. The life span on the component could be 50 years.


point taken. my thinking, however, is that the voltage regulator is a commonly available cheap
part anyway and the "worst case" repair scenario would be to replace it :)
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Mashiro
0 #13 Mashiro 2016-05-12 16:57
Quoting adder:
The sample has a power regulator chip right after the power input; I forgot the part number but I had looked it up back in the time and its spec sheet showed that it will happily regulate voltage all the way up to 20V. It does heat up when you apply higher voltage, but it has a heatsink attached, so really no problem.


Yes there is a voltage regulator, however even with the heat sink allowing to dissipate heat faster, the increased heat will shorten the lifespan of the regulator faster.

How much faster, whos know. The life span on the component could be 50 years.

Plus the voltage regulator works in terms of tolerance, so its function is to deal with fluctuating voltage to keep it within the 10v range, not to bring anything you throw at it to 10v :-) So I can't quite recommend anyone to use what is higher then specified.
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adder
+1 #12 adder 2016-05-04 10:12
Thanks for your article, but just a small correction from my experience: I've been using the Akai S20 with a high quality 12V adapter for quite a while and there have been no problems. The sample has a power regulator chip right after the power input; I forgot the part number but I had looked it up back in the time and its spec sheet showed that it will happily regulate voltage all the way up to 20V. It does heat up when you apply higher voltage, but it has a heatsink attached, so really no problem.
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Mashiro
0 #11 Mashiro 2016-03-24 21:40
Yes! This is still actually happening! :lol:

I have been swamped with repairs as of late, and other projects, however it is on the bench at this very moment.

The display and through hole LED's are easy finds, and pretty simple installs. I will be ordering them soon, and along with this I will post all the data sheets and where to buy.

The rubber pads are not as easy, but there is a way
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Nikolas
+1 #10 Nikolas 2016-03-10 03:18
Quoting Shiina Mashiro:

I'm writing guides for changing all the LED colors, adding in a new number display with different colors, and in the process of making rubber replacement pads.


Oh please tell me this is coming to fruition? I just picked my first s20 up off craigslist last night (way overpaid, but I missed my chance for a deal locally 10 years ago) and I would absolutely love to source the proper size through-hole and smd diodes and a different color display, AND RUBBER PADS :eek: :eek: :eek:

Thanks for this site!
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Mashiro
+1 #9 Mashiro 2015-12-03 02:16
Thanks!

Yeah for the most part if it can easily be googled already, I won't share it, unless I do it myself, and feel I can explain it better and have more pictures or something :-)

I'll have quite a lot more coming soon. I couldn't be more happy that it's been useful for a handful of people
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invisalign
+1 #8 invisalign 2015-11-28 00:37
Appreciating the dedication you put into your website and detailed information you present.

It's good to come across a blog every once in a while that isn't
the same outdated rehashed information. Fantastic read!
I've bookmarked your site and I'm including your RSS feeds to my Google account.
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Mashiro
0 #7 Mashiro 2015-11-14 19:17
Man like Nakoi inside!

Glad you got it working. Good word on the Genesis Power Supply. Would defiantly be a better alternative to the DIY one I have listed.

I'll actually order one and give it a shot. If it works out for me, I'll be sure to include that!
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Nikoi
0 #6 Nikoi 2015-10-04 03:22
can confirm genesis supply working also i had taken this out again after years not finding the old power supply and it wouldnt turn on then found this guide thank you!!
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Mashiro
+1 #5 Mashiro 2015-07-29 20:02
Yeah the fuse I used in the guide, also incredibly small! So happy to hear you have it working! It's a really fun machine.

I'm writing guides for changing all the LED colors, adding in a new number display with different colors, and in the process of making rubber replacement pads.

The manual is really well written. There are links to that in the article on the S20 if you need it ;-)
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